A Christian Almshouse - Sheltered Accommodation for Independent Living

A Christian Almshouse - Sheltered Accommodation for Independent Living

The earliest reference to the Hospital of St Nicholas was in 1215, when it provided rest and shelter for travellers who had crossed the ford of the river at Harnham, immediately to the south of the property, on their way to Old Sarum. By the end of the next decade in 1227, it had developed following generous endowments of land from two benefactors, to provide for “the reception, care and maintenance of Christ’s poor, sick and infirm”. The original 13th century buildings provided separate accommodation for men and women in “cells” parts of which are still in existence today.

In 1229, Bishop Bingham built the bridge across the river at Harnham, and one of the two chapels, built in 1244, is still used for daily worship today. The institution originally operated as an infirmary, but that function had ceased by the end of the fifteenth century, when the residents were expected to attend daily worship - a tradition that extends to the present.

From its origin in medieval times the Hospital has survived the Reformation, the Commonwealth and Restoration periods. It has developed considerably since it was the inspiration for “Hiram’s Hospital” in Anthony Trollope’s novel “The Warden”. It has been expanded by the building of three blocks of self-contained flats – Pelly House (1965), MacInnes House (1978) and the Garden House (1994). During this period, the bed-sitting rooms in the old blocks have been converted into modern self-contained flats.

Today the Trustees offer 24 flats to single people of both sexes or couples of limited means, both clergy and lay people, who follow the Christian faith and are prepared to participate in daily worship and are happy to form part of a Community. For eight centuries the members of this institution have prayed that “God will bless the Community of St Nicholas and those who serve Him in this place.” They continue to do so.

St Nicholas Hospital
St Nicholas Hospital Christian Almshouse in Salisbury

The earliest reference to the Hospital of St Nicholas was in 1215, when it provided rest and shelter for travellers who had crossed the ford of the river at Harnham, immediately to the south of the property, on their way to Old Sarum. By the end of the next decade in 1227, it had developed following generous endowments of land from two benefactors, to provide for “the reception, care and maintenance of Christ’s poor, sick and infirm”. The original 13th century buildings provided separate accommodation for men and women in “cells” parts of which are still in existence today.   

In 1229, Bishop Bingham built the bridge across the river at Harnham, and one of the two chapels, built in 1244, is still used for daily worship today. The institution originally operated as an infirmary, but that function had ceased by the end of the fifteenth century, when the residents were expected to attend daily worship - a tradition that extends to the present.

From its origin in medieval times the Hospital has survived the Reformation, the Commonwealth and Restoration periods. It has developed considerably since it was the inspiration for “Hiram’s Hospital” in Anthony Trollope’s novel “The Warden”. It has been expanded by the building of three blocks of self-contained flats – Pelly House (1965), MacInnes House (1978) and the Garden House (1994). During this period, the bed-sitting rooms in the old blocks have been converted into modern self-contained flats.   

Today the Trustees offer 24 flats to single people of both sexes or couples of limited means, both clergy and lay people, who follow the Christian faith and are prepared to participate in daily worship and are happy to form part of a Community. For eight centuries the members of this institution have prayed that “God will bless the Community of St Nicholas and those who serve Him in this place.” They continue to do so.

St Nicholas Hospital
St Nicholas Hospital Christian Almshouse in Salisbury

Community Life

There are 23 self-contained mostly single-bedroom apartments set in small blocks and is a flourishing and vibrant Christian community of men and women.

Vacancies

All applications are reviewed according to need, the suitability of the accommodation available, and the interests of the Community.

The Chapel

There is a daily Chapel service in St. Nicholas' Chapel, which is either a Eucharist or a simple service from the Book of Common Prayer.

History

The Hospital is associated with the fictional fosterchild Anthony Trollope's Barchester, as the original of the institution so vividly described in The Warden.

Community Life

There are 23 self-contained mostly single-bedroom apartments set in small blocks and is a flourishing and vibrant Christian community of men and women.

Vacancies

All applications are reviewed according to need, the suitability of the accommodation available, and the interests of the Community.

The Chapel

There is a daily Chapel service in St. Nicholas' Chapel, which is either a Eucharist or a simple service from the Book of Common Prayer.

History

The Hospital is associated with the fictional fosterchild Anthony Trollope's Barchester, as the original of the institution so vividly described in The Warden.

The Hospital of St. Nicholas, is a flourishing and vibrant Christian almshouse in Salisbury. Sheltered accommodation for independent living, where men and women live in fellowship with one another.

Address: St Nicholas Hospital, St Nicholas Road, Salisbury SP1 2SW

Clerk: 01722 340369
clerk.stnicholashospital@outlook.com
Master: 01722 336874
kpaul.mellor@gmail.com

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The Hospital of St. Nicholas, is a flourishing and vibrant Christian almshouse in Salisbury. Sheltered accommodation for independent living, where men and women live in fellowship with one another.

Address: St Nicholas Hospital, St Nicholas Road, Salisbury SP1 2SW

Clerk: 01722 340369
clerk.stnicholashospital@outlook.com
Master: 01722 336874
kpaul.mellor@gmail.com

Please enter your name.
Please enter a message.